BengKung Belly Binding – An ancient technique, What, Why, and How

After your new little life is here, it can be easy to forget about the healing mother. During pregnancy and childbirth the hips open, the abdominal muscles separate, the uterus grows, the skin stretches, and the cervix dilates. This is a normal part of childbearing but requires some healing time.

Your changing body will feel stretched and open but wouldn’t it be nice to feel firm, supported, and warm? BengKung Belly Binding can help support your healing muscles, warm your shrinking uterus, and close your pelvic floor.

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What is Bengkung Belly Binding?

 

Belly Binding is an ancient technique consisting of binding a postpartum woman’s abdomen to promote recovery and provide comfort and support to her healing womb. Made from 100% cotton fabric, the bind is wrapped snuggly from just below the woman’s chest to below her hips. This provides support to her abdominal wall and muscles, improves posture, supports loose ligaments and hips, and assists her organs to return to their pre-pregnancy positions.

Heres some information on Cultures and Beliefs of Belly Binding.

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When Can I Start Belly Binding?

 

Vaginal Delivery – As long as you’re cleared by your primary care provider, you can start binding during the first week postpartum. Usually 2-3 days after delivery.

Cesarean Delivery – You can start binding after you’re cleared by your primary care provider, usually after your incision site has healed and any stitches removed. Typically between 4-6 weeks postpartum is a common time to start.

Miscarriage/Stillborn – You can absolutely bind after a pregnancy/baby loss. This can help with your physical as well as emotional healing. Visit StillBirthDay.com for more resources.

You can bind for 2-12 hours per day or as long as your comfortable. If the bind starts to hurt or you feel too constricted, it may be time for a break. Traditionally, it’s common to bind for the first 40 days postpartum, but some bind much longer.

What if you’re already 8 weeks postpartum? 12 weeks? 1 year? It’s not too late! Bind anytime for additional support!

*Consult your primary care provider before beginning any wellness program.

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Benefits of BengKung Belly Binding

Physical Benefits

– Pelvic Floor Support

– Back Support

Diastasis Recti 

– Decreases postpartum bleeding time

Breastfeeding Support

– Posture

– Modesty

Emotional/Spiritual Wellbeing

     -Taking the time each day to care for yourself, recognizing that the postpartum mother is just as important as your new little life, and wrapping yourself with the comfort and care that you deserve is a valuable addition to your daily routine.

     -Positive Self Image – Using beautiful fabric to wrap your healing body not only looks great, but feels great too. When you feel good and supported, you feel better about yourself in general. Happy moms lead to happy babies.

     -Postpartum wrapping helps slim your ribs, hips, and abdomen by holding them in place and guiding them back to together as they heal.

You can find detailed benefits of BengKung Belly Bind and pro’s and con’s to this style of postpartum wrapping in this corresponding post.

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Warming Belly Paste/Essential oil

Warming Paste

If you’re looking for some additional benefits from postpartum belly binding, you can add in some healing herbs or essential oils. Birth is considered to be a “cooling process” in many cultures and re-warming the area provides physical and possibly spiritual benefits. Warming paste applied directly to the skin is made from natural herbs and spices. It is said to increase muscle tone and tighten the skin. It also increases blood flow to the abdominal area, stimulates the release of retained water which can occur after childbirth, and promotes healing due to its warming effects.

You can purchase a warming herb mixture from places like Etsy or Local Belly Binding Specialists, or you can make your own. I made some and got most of my ingredients from mountain rose herbs (all organic if available). You’ll want the ground/powder versions of the herbs, or plan on grinding them down yourself.

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Here’s what I put in my mixture:

  • Cinnamon – Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, lowers blood sugar levels, antibacterial, anti-fungal
  • Cardamom – anti-depressant, treats urinary disorders, antimicrobial, antispasmodic, anti-asthmatic, anti-inflammatory, detoxification, improves blood circulation, remedy for nausea/vomiting
  • Ginger – Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, reduces muscle pain and soreness, lowers blood sugars, reduces menstrual pain, lowers cholesterol, anti-carcinogenic, improves brain function, fights infections
  • Nutmeg – pain relief, helps indigestion, detox the body, improve blood circulation, improves skin health
  • Turmeric – Super spice, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, increases brain function, anti-carcinogenic, anti-depressant, anti-aging
  • and other warming herbs (use some of your favorites!)

*information taken from a variety of sources

♦ ♦ ♦ Store dry in a waterproof container like a mason jar or plastic jar with a lid. To use, mix herbs with equal parts carrier oil of your choice (coconut oil, sesame oil, olive oil, etc.) with the herb mixture to create a paste. Apply directly to the skin and place an under wrap or pad over paste because it can stain your wrap (may also stain hands so consider wearing gloves). Then wrap abdomen with a bengkung belly bind. Wear 2-4 hours daily. ♦ ♦ ♦

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Essential Oil Application

Essential oils can be used instead of the warming paste if you prefer. Most of the herbs listed above are available in essential oil form. There are many books and other informational resources available for you to study the benefits and risks of essential oil use.

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Video Tutorials

You can make your own bind with this video tutorial here! You can also dye your belly bind yourself for a beautiful look. Below are some videos on wrapping your BengKung Belly Bind.

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~ All things for you and your new little life ~

BengKung Belly Binding - An ancient technique, What, Why, and How

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